Trading Push for Pull: What I Learned About Vacation

gkerinaEmotional And Mental Health, Personal Development4 Comments

A funny thing happened on the way to the alarm clock. After three non-stop years of making my way through several major life events, including the death of a parent and moving abroad, I have decision fatigue. This is turning out to be a good thing. A Line In The Sand At the beginning of November, after a year of struggling to calm my overwhelmed HSP sensibilities and find a more stable foothold amid all the changes in the realms of home, finances, work, and family, I snapped. It was like my psyche drew a line in the sand and said, “Take one more step and I won’t be responsible for the results.” I’d been pushing myself and my life improvement agendas hard in order to make my life better as soon as possible, but it was backfiring. The line drawn by my psyche took the form of an insistence that I go on vacation, immediately and lengthily. Creating Vacation I live in southwestern Germany, within easy reach of loads of wonderful places to get away to, but an extended away-from-home vacation was not feasible considering the transitional state of my work and finances. So, to appease my psyche, and because I recognized a mental health red flag when I saw it, I decided to go on vacation in a different way. Late one night, I sat at my desk and drew up an “Official Vacation Declaration” consisting of three lists: things I commit to doing during my vacation, things I excuse myself from during my vacation, and things I’m allowed to do during my vacation. I tuned in to what my sensitive body and over-taxed mind needed and considered how the practicalities of my life could bend toward a vacation. I thought deeply about what to put on each … Read More

7 Reasons To Use Ashwagandha For Your Health

Maria HillHealth, Herbal Remedies, Physical Health, Stress5 Comments

One of Ayurveda’s most important herbs is ashwagandha which is known for its ability to relieve stress. According to Wikipedia, ashwagandha also known as Indian ginseng, is from the nightshade family – the same family that brings you potatoes, tomatoes, tobacco and petunias. It has been used for centuries for a variety of health benefits. Ashwagandha is important for highly sensitive people because it is a highly effective and non-toxic way to heal the effects of stress. In Ayurveda, it is used to treat all sorts of debilitating illnesses. Ashwaghandha is a restorative herb and adaptogen, which means it helps the body handle stress. making it very helpful for highly sensitive people. It is said to confer the strength of a horse, protecting and enhancing the energy of the body. Ashwagandha is often used as an aphrodisiac and enhancer of sexual energy, but is increasingly seen as a useful herb to protect anyone from the effects of modern stressful living. According to Banyan Botanicals  ashwagandha is also useful in protecting bones and joints and therefore helps with arthritis. It supports the immune system and adrenal functioning. Adrenal fatigue is often a consequence of long term stress and can result in many other physical ailments including allergies and obesity.  Natural Herbs Guide cites a study on ashwagandha which found that this herb offered a lot of antioxidants which explains its support for the immune system, its restorative capabilities and its help with healthy aging. Ashwagandha helps minimize the effects of illness. According to Ashwagandha Benefits, some people use it to minimize the effects of: chemotherapy, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, stress induced ulcers and osteo and rheumatoid arthritis. Ashwaghandha helps stabilize blood sugar and supports the liver as well as the adrenals. Highly sensitive people suffer from chronic stress and other illnesses. Although changes to lifestyle can yield many benefits, highly sensitive people often need … Read More

HSP Toolbox: Daily Journaling

ladyakeryEmotional And Mental Health, Personal Development, Stress17 Comments

Highly sensitive people tend to be empathic by nature, but focusing on the wants and needs of others can sometimes result in self-neglect. Unexpressed thoughts or feelings can lead to stress, anxiety, and poor health. However, expressing yourself does not mean you have to confide in another person. The simple act of writing on paper gives you an outlet for your inner life and protects you from reactions or criticisms that a person might have. Journaling might seem like a daunting task, but if you keep your expectations low, you can create a safe place for honesty. Daily Journaling You do not have to be a great writer or have nice penmanship to benefit from this activity. You just need to be honest with and compassionate toward yourself. Necessary tools: a notebook and a pen. I encourage you to write, not to type. You could do this activity with a word processor on your computer, but the act of writing by hand discourages self-criticism and impulsive editing. Write two pages in long hand, front and back. The ominous tick of a timer can interrupt the flow of your thoughts onto the page. By setting a goal to write until you’ve filled up two pages, you’re free to take as much or as little time as you need. Do not censor or edit. Your inner critic will want to scratch out a poorly worded sentence. Your mind is not subject to readership. Be honest. Your inner empath will refrain from saying what you really feel (i.e. “My neighbor is so rude for blasting the music at 2 AM.”). No one will see these pages but you. You can’t afford to lie to yourself. Keep writing. Even if you have nothing to write about, then write: “I have nothing to write about.” Keep the … Read More